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House Proceeding 02-06-07 on Feb 6th, 2007 :: 5:02:45 to 5:19:50
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Lincoln Davis

5:01:41 to 5:02:45( Edit History Discussion )
Speech By: Lincoln Davis

Lincoln Davis

5:02:26 to 5:02:45( Edit History Discussion )

Lincoln Davis: great grandchildren will still see us there. but we have to take another look at having success, because what we're doing now is not what the american people have. i yield back the remaining

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:02:45 to 5:03:03( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: portion of my time. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 18, 2007, february -- that date is incorrect. today is february 6, 2007, the chair recognizes the

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:02:45 to 5:19:50( Edit History Discussion )
Speech By: Roscoe G. Bartlett

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:03:03 to 5:03:25( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: gentleman from maryland, mr. bartlett for 60 minutes. mr. bartlett: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. bartlett: thank you. madam speaker,

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:03:25 to 5:03:45( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: there are three different groups in our country and indeed worldwide, at least for some of these issues, that have common cause in campaigning for a reduction in the use of fossil fuels. these

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:03:45 to 5:04:02( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: three groups come from very different perspectives. but as you will see from our discussions this evening, they really do have common cause, because to solve the problems that brings them

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:04:02 to 5:04:25( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: to this dialogue, all three of these groups are advocating essentially the same thing, that is a reduction in our use of fossil fuels. the first of these groups is the group, a very large

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:04:25 to 5:04:42( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: group, which has again inconcern about national security interests. probably two years ago now or nearly that, 30 of our prominent americans, gray, mcfar land, jim woolsey and 27 others, some of

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:04:42 to 5:05:00( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: them senior military people, wrote a letter to the president, saying mr. president, the fact in our country, only 2% of the known reserves of world oil, and we use 25% of the world's oil,

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:05:00 to 5:05:14( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: importing almost 2/3 of what we use, represents a totally unacceptable national security risk. the president himself recognized this in his state of the union a year ago, when he noted that we get

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:05:14 to 5:05:30( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: soff this oil from countries as he said that don't even like us very much. that's a bit of an understatement for some of those countries. the next chart shows a recognition of this on the part

5:05:30 to 5:05:43( Edit History Discussion )

of our secretary of state. this was april 5 of last year. we do have to do something about the energy problem. i can tell you that nothing has really taken me aback more as secretary of state than

5:05:43 to 5:06:00( Edit History Discussion )

the way that the politics of energy is. i will use the word warping diplomacy around the world. we have simply got to do something about the warping now of diplomatic effort by the all-out rush

5:06:00 to 5:06:19( Edit History Discussion )

for energy supply. and i'm sure that in her head, she had a mental picture of this really interesting map of the world. this shows what our world would look like if the size of each country was

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:06:19 to 5:06:38( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: determined by its reserves of oil. you can see how america, right here, tiny on this map of the world. we represent about less than 5% of the people in the world and only have 2% of the oil

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:06:38 to 5:06:51( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: in the world but using 25% of the oil. look at how small we are. we would sit many times inside saudi arabia. we're about the size of qatar here, aren't we? we would fit four times in kuwait

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:06:51 to 5:07:09( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: if the land mass of kuwait was relative to how much oil they have. russia up there, they're a big exporter now, but they can be a big exporter, because they aren't using anywhere near as

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:07:09 to 5:07:34( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: we are. well, that large community in our country, which is genuinely concerned about national security interests understands our problems that come from this distribution of oil. many of these

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:07:34 to 5:07:49( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: are in countries what we call the royal families. they are really dictatorships, kuwait, saudi arabia, united emirates, and then in iran that is controlled by the -- and we have venezuela, a

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:07:49 to 5:08:05( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: communist state. the president said in that state of the union message a year ago that we're getting oil, many of the reserves are in countries that don't even like us very much. fortunately

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:08:05 to 5:08:20( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: our imported oil doesn't come from the mix as we see it here, because we're getting oil where it's cheaper to ship it, so a lot of our oil comes from canada. they are tiny in terms of

5:08:20 to 5:08:33( Edit History Discussion )

reserves. and we get oil from mexico and venezuela. just because of economics, it's cheaper to ship it those short distances. this is one group in common cause wanting to reduce our consumption

5:08:33 to 5:08:50( Edit History Discussion )

of fossil fuels, particularly oil, because we're so dependent on the rest of the world, which as condoleezza rice says presents a very real national security problem. a second group that is

5:08:50 to 5:09:02( Edit History Discussion )

interested in reducing our use of these fossil fuels, particularly oil, is the group that believes that where the united states has reached its maximum production of oil in 1970, that the world

5:09:02 to 5:09:16( Edit History Discussion )

is about to approach that point now. and if you aren't concerned about national security risks and you aren't concerned about climate change, which is going to the third one we talk about,

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:09:16 to 5:09:32( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: you would really be concerned about oil if you recognize that there's not going to be enough of it in the future, so it will be a real economic problem. what we have here is the united states

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:09:32 to 5:09:44( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: production, hubbert versus actual. and this is from a report from the cambridge research energy associates, who are trying to point out that m.k. hubbert was not accurate in his prediction

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:09:44 to 5:10:03( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: of what the united states would do and therefore, you shouldn't take him very seriously when he predicted that world would be peaking about now. the average person looking at this would say

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:10:03 to 5:10:19( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: they are kind of picking, because this is hubbert's lower production and the red is the actual. and of course added to the lower 48 was our big discovery in dead horse and alaska, and our oil discoveries

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:10:19 to 5:10:34( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: in the gulf of mexico. well, i think these two curves run pretty darn close together. and so that growing community of people that have a genuine concern about the availability of oil in the

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:10:34 to 5:10:50( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: future, this chart has real meaning. you might look at the next chart here before we move to those who are concerned about climate change. this is a chart which presents the challenge that we

5:10:50 to 5:11:03( Edit History Discussion )

face from what's called peak oil. and these bars here represent the discovers of oil. and you note that the big discoveries were back in the 1960's and 1970's. and on average, the discoveries

5:11:03 to 5:11:17( Edit History Discussion )

have been reducing down, down, down. anyone who has had any math and charting and so forth in schools know that if you draw a smooth curve over this, the area will represent the total amount of

5:11:17 to 5:11:30( Edit History Discussion )

oil that we have found. indeed each of these represents a reservoir of oil. if you add up all these bars, you have the total. and that's what you do when you smooth it up, you add them all up.

5:11:30 to 5:11:40( Edit History Discussion )

the solid line represents the amount of oil we have been using. we started out really rich, didn't we? this much oil, we were using this tiny bit down here. it looked like oil was going to be for

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:11:40 to 5:11:56( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: ever. looking how much we are using and how much is out there. look what happened. we continued to use more and more as the industrial revolution deproo grew and as our population grew

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:11:56 to 5:12:11( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: and we used more energy to make our lives comfortable and our use continued to grow and grow but the discovery started to falling off in 1965, they started falling off, down, down and down. that

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:12:11 to 5:12:27( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: is despite better techniques of finding oil. computer modeling, we have a good idea of what the geology of the world looks like and find gas and oil in only unique geology call formations.

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:12:27 to 5:12:38( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: maybe later we'll have a chance to talk about those so you have some expectation of what we might find in the future. well, here we are now, this about 2007. we have been using more oil since

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:12:38 to 5:12:48( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: about 1980 that we have been finding. we have been eating up that reserve now. so we've taken some of this to fill in this space. so now you look to the future and what will the future look like?

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:12:48 to 5:13:00( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: we have some options on what the future will look like. one of the options we don't have is pumping oil we haven't found. so when you -- unless you think we're going to find more oil than this chart

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:13:00 to 5:13:12( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: indicates, and of course it won't be a nice smooth downcurve like that. it will be up and down. but generally will be down, most people recognize. well, we can used all sorts of enhanced

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:13:12 to 5:13:24( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: recovery techniques and pump it sooner and you may get more from those enhanced recovery techniques. but you can't pump what you haven't found. so this shows you very graphically. if you only

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:13:24 to 5:13:40( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: had one graph to look at to help you understand what we're facing in terms of peak oil, this would be the graph. so you understand now why this second group is really concerned about our use of

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:13:40 to 5:13:54( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: fossil fuels, particularly oil, because it's very probable that the world will reach its maximum production of oil, d may have already if not soon, and the demand for oil has been going roughly

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:13:54 to 5:14:08( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: 2% per year. it will be an ever increasing difference between the available oil and the demand for oil. of course when that happens, of course, when demand exceeds supply, price goes up. we've seen

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:14:08 to 5:14:23( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: oil prices go up from a relative few years ago from $10 a barrel to $60 a barrel. it was a few months ago $78 a barrel. it was a fear factor. it dropped very quickly to $18 a barrel. but very

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:14:23 to 5:14:34( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: volatile market. up and down a dollar a day. another fear factor it could jump another $18. the next chart i have here is one that shows the concerns that the -- that this third group has.

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:14:34 to 5:14:51( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: and that's the concern about climate change. and i have something i want to read here. this chart comes from this document, by the way, the stearn review. the economics of climate change. and

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:14:51 to 5:15:04( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: it says here, the scientific evidence is now overwhelming. climate change prevents an urgent global response. climate change is global in its causes and consequences, and international collective

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:15:04 to 5:15:18( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: action will be critical in driving an effective, efficient and equity response on the scale required. this reminds me of a visit we just made. i came back just about a month ago from china.

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:15:18 to 5:15:34( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: nine of us. nine members of congress went over, and the primary reason for the trip was to talk to them about energy. and i was surprised and pleased when they began their discussion of energy

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:15:34 to 5:15:51( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: by talking about postoil. i said, gee, they get it. somehow a civilization that was a golden civilization when my forefathers were barbarians running around europe has a longer view of things

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:15:51 to 5:16:01( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: than we seem to have. we have trouble looking beyond our next quarterly report here. they are looking postoil, they say. they recognize there will be a postoil period. 8,000 years of recorded

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:16:01 to 5:16:15( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: history. we have been in the age of oil about 100, 150 years. if it's half gone and it follows a bell curve as it did in our country, and it probably will in the world, we have about another

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:16:15 to 5:16:28( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: 100, 150 years of oil. an ever increasing cost and ever decreasing amounts when we get the oil which is harder and harder to get. climate changes prevents a unique challenge for economics. it's

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:16:28 to 5:16:40( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: one of the widest economic failure we have ever seen. strong early action on climate change outweigh the cost, they say. so this is a little chart that shows where these gases come from. just

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:16:40 to 5:16:55( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: a moment of explanation as to why the use of oil and so forth produces climate change. when you go out into your car this evening, if you go out, if it's parked outside and the sun is shining in,

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:16:55 to 5:17:05( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: and if you go out before dark your car will be very much warmer inside than it is outside. and we call that the greenhouse effect. and what happens is as the light from the sun comes in in a very

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:17:05 to 5:17:20( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: broad wave length spectrum from very long waves to very short waves and they go easily through your car, most of them through the car window. and then that sun heats up the material inside

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:17:20 to 5:17:34( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: your car, and that reradiates in the infrared. well, the glass is relatively impembyuss to imfrom a red. it reflects it back and that's called the greenhouse effect and your car gets warmer

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:17:34 to 5:17:51( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: and warmer. you may see that on a summer day. that's why you shouldn't leave your children and animals inside the car when you leave it. well, there are gases in the atmosphere that do essentially

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:17:51 to 5:18:04( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: the same thing as the glass in your automobile. you may remember riding into the airplane and you're very comfortable sitting in there at 38,000 or 42,000. and the pilot says it's minus 48 degrees

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:18:04 to 5:18:21( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: outside. the reason you could be so warm is all of the heat radiated back from the earth, long infrared rays. one of the things that reflects them back is gases up in the atmosphere. and there

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:18:21 to 5:18:38( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: are a number of those gases, methane and carbon dioxide is the major. carbon dioxide absolutely essential for plant life. and they are so efficient. our oxygen is about 21%. we could do about

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:18:38 to 5:19:02( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: half of that. these plants make due on .04%. you could get by on the top of mount everest so easily and not pressurize the cockpit that you are riding in. what stunned me in this report was when

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:19:02 to 5:19:20( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: i read that our earth now is only five degrees sent grade, that's nine degrees fahrenheit warmer than it was in the last ice age. without. what a small change in temperature makes. just nine degrees

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:19:20 to 5:19:35( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: cooler fahrenheit and we had glaciers that came down to southeast ohio. you can see the terminal meranes there. it left the mounds of grafble and dirt there. i'm very pleased to be joined by one

Roscoe G. Bartlett

5:19:35 to 5:19:50( Edit History Discussion )

Roscoe G. Bartlett: of our nation's leading voices and authorities on climate change, my colleague, also from the great state of maryland, congressman gilchrest. mr. gilchrest: i thank the gentleman from maryland,

Wayne T. Gilchrest

5:19:50 to 5:20:07( Edit History Discussion )

Wayne T. Gilchrest: mr. bartlett, for yielding, and for having this time so we can discuss these issues of energy, its ramifications to national security, the environment and to the economy. and i would like to

Wayne T. Gilchrest

5:19:50 to 5:34:08( Edit History Discussion )
Speech By: Wayne T. Gilchrest

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