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Video archive of the US Congress

House Proceeding 04-23-09 on Apr 23rd, 2009 :: 1:07:45 to 1:41:35
Total video length: 1 hours 42 minutes Stream Tools: Stream Overview | Edit Time

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Ed Whitfield

1:07:41 to 1:08:02( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: the congressional progressive caucus, the progressive message, hear about the progressive promise and give us your ideas. thank you. we yield back our time. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. the gentleman yields back his time. under the speaker's announced policy of january 6, 2009, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. witfield, is recognized for 60

Ed Whitfield

1:07:45 to 1:41:35( Edit History Discussion )
Speech By: Ed Whitfield

Ed Whitfield

1:08:03 to 1:08:23( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: minutes as the designee of the minority leader. the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: thank you, madam speaker. yesterday was earth day and the people around this country and around the world celebrated this great planity -- great planet that we live on. and all of u whether we're

Ed Whitfield

1:08:24 to 1:08:44( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: democrats or republicans or independents are committed to protecting this climate for the well-being of future generations. i think most of us would also agree that one of the major issues facing the entire world today relates to the strength of

Ed Whitfield

1:08:45 to 1:09:05( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: the world's economy and the loss of jobs that is taking p around the world. we know that right here in america our unemployment rate is up to about 8.6% at this time. last month it was about 8.1%. in my home state of kentucky, we

Ed Whitfield

1:09:06 to 1:09:28( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: have some counties with unemployment about 15% and i understand that in the state of michigan, where we've had the automobile difficulties, the unemployment rate in that state is around 15%. and so as we talk about strengthening the economy, the two most important policies

Ed Whitfield

1:09:29 to 1:09:50( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: relating to that are a tax policy, number one, and energy policy, number two. and it's already been pointed out today by many people that the u.s. congress is in the process of considering a comprehensive energy bill that would bring about dramatic

Ed Whitfield

1:09:51 to 1:10:12( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: changes in the way america produced energy -- produces energy. now, when we talk about energy, of course there are two aspects of it. number one, we're talking about how do we fuel our transportion needs? and everyone knows that we do import a lot of foreign oil

Ed Whitfield

1:10:13 to 1:10:33( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: because we're consuming about 22 million barrels of oil a day. and we're not producing that much oil in america. and worldwide we're consuming about 85 million barrels of oil a day. and by the way, that about what the total production of oil is

Ed Whitfield

1:10:34 to 1:10:57( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: worldwide, around 85 million barrels of oil a day. so that's one aspect of this energy issue. a second part of it is how do you produce electricity? and that's vitally important, as we find ourselves in america competing with other countries around the world.

Ed Whitfield

1:10:58 to 1:11:19( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and in america we happen to be very fortunate in that we have a 250-year supply of coal. it's our most abundant resource. and by the way, not only is it our most abundant resource, but it is also the most economical

Ed Whitfield

1:11:20 to 1:11:40( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: way to produce electricity. my home state kentucky, for example, 90% of all the electricity produced in kentucky is produced with coal. anthat's why in kentucky we have some of the lowest electrical rates in the world. between four cents and five

Ed Whitfield

1:11:41 to 1:12:03( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: cents per kilowatt hour. now, in california and massachusetts and other states where they do not really favor the use of coal, they're paying in the neighborhood of 15 cents, 14 cents per kilowatt hour. now, we recognize, and it goes without saying, that coal is a

Ed Whitfield

1:12:04 to 1:12:27( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: fuel that produced carbon dioxide and other emissions. and we know that climate change is one of the most important issues facing america today. now one of the great things about our democracy is we can sit around and have debates about the issues. and i thinit's important for the american people to hear

Ed Whitfield

1:12:28 to 1:12:49( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: those debates. because, as we discuss the emissions of carbon dioxide we oftentimes listen to the united nations' international climate change panel. that is the scientific group that does the most studies and

Ed Whitfield

1:12:50 to 1:13:10( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: does projections about global warming. and they use complicated models to predict what the future will hold. and they do core drillings in the ice panels, the north pole, south pole, to determine how the weather has been in the last thousands of years and we know that there are patterns of

Ed Whitfield

1:13:11 to 1:13:31( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: heating and warming and heating and warming. but one thing that i wou like to point out this evening, becaus global warming, is that we've had had extensive hearings on energy -- we've had extensive hearingings on energy and global warming and climate change.

Ed Whitfield

1:13:32 to 1:13:52( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: everyone says emphatically that the models cannot predict with any accuracy wt the temperature is going to be anywhere in the world 100 years from now. and witnesses have also been

Ed Whitfield

1:13:53 to 1:14:13( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: very clear in their testimony that when the united nations' international climate change panel issues a press release from the review of their models t particular issues, that they normally take the worst-case scenario and that is what's

Ed Whitfield

1:14:14 to 1:14:34( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: released to the international in media. and so when we read stories in the international us in media, there seems to be a tendency to scare people about what's going on with global warming. and i think it's important tha we recognize that.

Ed Whitfield

1:14:35 to 1:14:56( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and one of the leadin environmentalists who was called mr. green at one time in europe, is a fellow named bjornlun bjorn lunborg and he wrote a book called "the skeptical environmentalist." and in that book he wt into

Ed Whitfield

1:14:57 to 1:15:18( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: great detail about the flaws in the models that are being used to project future climate change. and i point that out because i've heard mantimes that the scientific evidence is indisputable. cannot be contradicted. and i would like the american

Ed Whitfield

1:15:19 to 1:15:39( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: people to know that i've sat in on many hearings on this issue and i've heard scientists disagree on this iss. but the important thing is, we need to debate it, the american people will finally ke their decision about it and they make those decisions in elections and they vote for whoever they want to vote and they listen to the

Ed Whitfield

1:15:40 to 1:16:00( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: arguments and they decide what they think's in their best interest. and that's the way it should be. but i want to get back to coal for just a minute. in this energy bill that's being considered in the u.s. congress today, one big part of that is

Ed Whitfield

1:16:01 to 1:16:22( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: called cap an trade. and it plays a prominent part -- cap and trade and it plays a prominent part also in president obama's budget because in his budget he indicated that he anticipates revenue from cap and trade in the amount of about $657 billion over 10 years.

Ed Whitfield

1:16:23 to 1:16:44( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: from selling permits to entities so that they can emit carbon dioxide. now i think it's also important to rember that when peter orszag, the chairman of office of management and budget in the obama white house, testified in congress, he said that that figure may very well be

Ed Whitfield

1:16:45 to 1:17:05( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: conservative. it could be twice or maybe three times that amount. so it could be anywhere from $657 billion to $1.7 trillion in cost to implement cap and trade. a

Ed Whitfield

1:17:06 to 1:17:26( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: designed to have people pay for emitting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. now, when people pay that much money to do it, every witness would almost agree, that go up.

Ed Whitfield

1:17:27 to 1:17:48( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and maybe that's not all bad because we know that if we're going to have a cleaner environment we're going to have to pay more. but just on the cap and trade aspect of this, which relates specifically to coal, i would like to remind everyone that the european union initiated a cap

Ed Whitfield

1:17:49 to 1:18:10( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and trade system four or five years ago. and i may not be exactly right on that. maybe it was three or four year ago, and last year they acknowledged that they had more carbon dioxide emissions than they had before they implemented cap and trade. now, to be fair, they've

Ed Whitfield

1:18:11 to 1:18:32( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: indicated also when they testified before the congress, that they think that they have fixed that problem and that they feel more confident as they move forward. but this cap and trade system is a prominent part in the obama

Ed Whitfield

1:18:33 to 1:18:54( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: energy plan that is now before the united states congress. and there's another aspect of it that bothers me, if you'll recall i talked about one of the major problems facing all of us today is the economy. trying to restore jobs, getting people back to work. getting those stock values back

Ed Whitfield

1:18:55 to 1:19:17( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: up in their pension plans and retirement plans. and in order to do that, america has to be competitive with other count they have to be able to products at a competive price that will sell all around the world. and who's one of the biggest

Ed Whitfield

1:19:18 to 1:19:40( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: competitors of america today? what country have we lost a lot of jobs to over the last three, four, five years? that country is china. and when the chinese, when we've met with the chinese, they've pointed out and they've been ve proud of the fact that they

Ed Whitfield

1:19:41 to 1:20:02( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: are bringing online a new coal-powered plant to produce electricity, a new one every two weeks. now, that's hard to imagine that they would bbuilding that many new coal-powered plants. and by the way, most of them don't have scrubbers, they're

Ed Whitfield

1:20:03 to 1:20:24( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: not capturing the co-2 emissions because, like in america and like in europe, the technology is not there. now, there are plenty of tests -- test, pilot projects around. there is one commercial application or two to capture carbon dioxide emissions. one in canada, one in norway. but the chinese are making it

Ed Whitfield

1:20:25 to 1:20:45( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: very clear that they want to produce more electricity with coal because it is the most economical way to produce electricity. and therefore they can produce more products at less cost. and i tell you something else they're doing, too, and a lot of people in america may say we ought to do that.

Ed Whitfield

1:20:46 to 1:21:08( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: but they put a cap on the price of fuel that they pay for their transportation needs. and, of course, as a result of putting that cap on the fuel, their government buyers, when they're out buying oil in the open market, they buy the highest sulfur-content oil available because it is the cheapest and what does that do?

Ed Whitfield

1:21:09 to 1:21:30( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: that pollutes even more. so as we debate this energy policy, just on the cap and trade aspect of it, america act unilaterally, are we going to place ourselves at a disadvantage? is it going to be more difficult

Ed Whitfield

1:21:31 to 1:21:53( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: for us to build plants, create jobs and produceroducts that are competitive in the world marketplace? and i would submit to you that the answer to that is yes. it will place us at a disadvantage. to do itnilaterally. so i think that's an important thing that we need tdiscuss we move forward.

Ed Whitfield

1:21:54 to 1:22:15( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: now, on another matter that is a -- plays a prominent place in the energy plan being advocated by our respected frids on the other side of the aisle, our democratic friends, and i might say that many of the democrats are very much concerned about it as well, that relates to renewable mandates.

Ed Whitfield

1:22:16 to 1:22:37( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: now, in america today, 51% of our electricity's produced by coal, about 20%'s produced by nuclear power and about -- less than 2% is produced by renewable and when i'm talking about renewable, i'm talking primarily about -- there's all sorts of renewable, biomass, ethanol, all sorts of things but i'm talking primarily here about wind power

Ed Whitfield

1:22:38 to 1:23:00( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and solar. because that plays a prominent role in the renewable mandate being proposed in the energy bill that's now before the congress. and the energy bill says that by the year 2025, or 2025, they want 20% of all

Ed Whitfield

1:23:01 to 1:23:23( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: electricity produced by renewable energy. in fact, when president obama was in europe recently, he's such a great speaker, an inspiring fellow, but he got up and he talked specifically about a number of countries, but one of the countries he talked about was spain.

Ed Whitfield

1:23:24 to 1:23:44( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and said, spain has been so effective in increasing its production of electricity with renewable renewables, renewable energy, and he said, america should blooking to spain and we need to get out in front the way spain -- spain is no smarter

Ed Whitfield

1:23:45 to 1:24:05( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: than we are, they're just more bold, they're investing, they're requiring investment in nuclear energy. i mean, not in nuclear energy but in production of electricity. and that's precisely what this energy bill is going to do. it's going to dictate that 20% of electricity be produced with renewables.

Ed Whitfield

1:24:06 to 1:24:26( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and if it is not producewith renewables then they're producing a five cent per kilo watt per hour penalty -- per kilowatt per hour penalty. i think most people who are experts in energy will tell you it's virtually impossible to produce 20% of our electricity with renewables by the year 20

Ed Whitfield

1:24:27 to 1:24:47( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: or 2025. for a lot of different reasons. now, first of all in states in the southeast we've seen repeatedly maps of the southeast, not only the southeast but missouri, kentucky, tennessee, alabama, mississippi, georgia, florida,

Ed Whitfield

1:24:48 to 1:25:08( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: ohio, michigan, they do not have the wind patterns to produce this electricity. and you know, we have a very antiquated grid system in america today so you're going to have to dramatically increase the capacity of this grid

Ed Whitfield

1:25:09 to 1:25:30( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: system. if you go to renewables to bring in energy produced by renewables from other parts of the country. into the southeast, particularly. but one of the primary arguments that we ar from our respected friends on the other side of the aisle is that, look, let's not be concerned about this because as we move into green technology, we're going to

Ed Whitfield

1:25:31 to 1:25:52( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: create thousands of green jobs. and those jobs are -- will be what will propel america into the future. and none of us in congress would object to that. and we know that there would be some green jobs created. but you know, we oftentimes do projections based on models and

Ed Whitfield

1:25:53 to 1:26:14( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: models frequently determine -- are determined by what you put in, what information you put into those models. but when you use i hardcore facts of what has happened -- impeercal data, hardcore facts of what has happened different conclusions.

Ed Whitfield

1:26:15 to 1:26:36( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: now i mentioned spain. there is a gentleman in spain named calvin alvarez. i'm sorry, gabriel alvarez. he's a ph.d. and he's at the university of

Ed Whitfield

1:26:37 to 1:26:57( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: juan carlos in spain. he wrote a -- he did a research project and it's about 45 pages. it's rht here. and he particularly looked at this issue of creating new jobs with green technology. and he came up with the

Ed Whitfield

1:26:58 to 1:27:21( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: conclusion that he goes into great detail about that for every one job createby green technology spain lost 2.2 jobs in traditional industries. now, is that the kind of tradeoff that america wants?

Ed Whitfield

1:27:22 to 1:27:43( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: yeah, we'd like to create green jobs, but we don't want to do it if we lose other jobs. and that is precisely what his study shows quite clearly. and he also goes into a great deal of -- detail in this study about the amount of money that

Ed Whitfield

1:27:44 to 1:28:04( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: would be invested -- that was invested in renewable energy in spain and that's precisely what they're trying to do in the energy bill, government money to subis he dies -- subsidize renewable energy. and so i think that america as we debate this energy bill we

Ed Whitfield

1:28:05 to 1:28:26( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: need to move forward very careful because we don't want to unilaterally place ourselves at a competitive disadvantage on the coal sector by using -- by implementing a cap and trade system that will penalize only americans and raise their electricity rates.

Ed Whitfield

1:28:27 to 1:28:48( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and we also don't want to lose 2.2 jobs for every one job created with green technology. if we have wed the same experience as they did in spain and we have reasons believe that they ll, according to this study. now, yesterday we had a hearing about this and we had the secretary of energy there.

Ed Whitfield

1:28:49 to 1:29:13( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and we had the administer of the e.p.a. there. and they'rthe ones that have the task of developing this energy policy for america. and when i ask them the question, because they and others had been talking about l the new green jobs that would be created, when i asked them if they had even seen this

Ed Whitfield

1:29:14 to 1:29:37( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: study both of them said no. and so we asked them, well, we think you need to look at this study because before america adopts an energy policy that will affect every man, woman and child in this country, every business in this country, every automobile driver in this country, what will the impact of it be?

Ed Whitfield

1:29:38 to 1:29:59( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and so we need detail studies so that we get both sides of the issue. we sat in these hearings and to be truthful we all wish that what is being said would be true , that, yes, we can automatically go to green and forget coal and forget nuclear.

Ed Whitfield

1:30:00 to 1:30:20( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: but it's impossible to do. so instead of looking through rose colored glasses, let's be realistic as we mo forward so we can make and give t american people the opportunity for the best decision that can be made. now, on this map right here

Ed Whitfield

1:30:21 to 1:30:43( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: there are a lot of red dots. and these red dots represent a nuclear power plant that is currently operating in america. and there are about 109 of them scattered throughout our country. and as i mentioned earlier, about 20% of our electricity's produced by nuclear.

Ed Whitfield

1:30:44 to 1:31:05( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: but it's very sad that in this energy bill that i've been discussing, it's over 657 pages, by the way, and it relates to everything. it relates to air-conditioners in your car. it relates to appliances in your home. it relates to efficiencies in building products.

Ed Whitfield

1:31:06 to 1:31:27( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: it relates to cap and trade. a smart grid, technology, global warming, all those things. but when you have something that's producing electricity in america like nuclear you would think there would be something in this energy bill about nuclear.\@\@

Ed Whitfield

1:31:28 to 1:31:49( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: particularly since we haven't had any nuclear power plants built in a long time because of the complex permitting process that makes it virtually impossible to build one. but there's not one item in this new energy bill about nuclear energy. and one thing i think is quite

Ed Whitfield

1:31:50 to 1:32:11( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: clear to the american people and should be clear to all of us because we know that in the next -- by the year 2035 the demand for electricity in america is going to increase by 35% and maybe more.

Ed Whitfield

1:32:12 to 1:32:33( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and particularly if we turn the economy around. so in order to meet that demand we're going to have to have everything that we have access to. we're going to have to have coal and there are a lot of people that do not want to use coal and it's going to be impossible we are going to have to use coal.

Ed Whitfield

1:32:34 to 1:32:58( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and that's why i'm going to digress for just a minute. that's why developing this technology, if carbon capture and squestation is so vitally -- seqestation is so important, and i would say that there is a professor at m.i.t. who wrote

Ed Whitfield

1:33:00 to 1:33:20( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: his his name is kurt house, and he's working with a group up in the northeast that are planning to build a $5 billion carbon capture and squestation facility to restore the carbon dioxide in the ocean floor. and it's that kind of innovative technology that we're going to

Ed Whitfield

1:33:21 to 1:33:41( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: have to have in order to meet our energy needs. but back to nuclear for just a moment. as you know, anytime you produce nuclear energy you have some spent fuel and there's some real

Ed Whitfield

1:33:42 to 1:34:02( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: problems with spent fuel so there's got to be a way to store it. and back in i think it was 1982 the congress passed a bill that imposed an excise fee on every producer of nuclear energy in america. and the purpose of that was to

Ed Whitfield

1:34:03 to 1:34:24( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: build a facility in nevada called yucca mountain in which they would store this spent fuel. but we -- the american taxpayer has already spent $9 billion on yucca mountain.

Ed Whitfield

1:34:25 to 1:34:46( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and if it were -- if it were allowed to be continued within the next three or four years it would be licensed and then four or five, 10 years after that they could start moving this spent fuel to yucca mountain. so where is this spent fuel right now? well, the spent fuel right now

Ed Whitfield

1:34:47 to 1:35:08( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: is located at each one of these 109 sites in america. where you ve a nuclear power plant you have spent fuel because there's no other place, there's no other place to put it, no other place to take it. now, i think the american people would find it interesting, because i don't think most of

Ed Whitfield

1:35:09 to 1:35:29( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: them really know that a lot of these nuclear power plants, because they have contractual arrangements with the federal government that they can store that spent fuel at yucca mountain, and by the way, president obama did not put any money in his budget for yucca mountain. and so there are a lot of

Ed Whitfield

1:35:30 to 1:35:51( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: stories going around soon after the budget came out that yucca mountain had been put on hd. now, we didn't know if they were going to continue to build it, try to get the license for it so we can start storing this material or not. and so i suppose it's going to be up to the appropriators in

Ed Whitfield

1:35:52 to 1:36:13( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: the congress to decide are they going to put any more money in yucca mountain. but we spent that $9 billion, and because the government had contracts with these nuclear energy producers to take that spent fuel and was not able to fulfill its obligati, what do you think the nuclear energy plants did?

Ed Whitfield

1:36:14 to 1:36:35( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: they did what any of us would do, they filed a lawsuit because of the breach of that contract. and as a result of that contract the u.s. government right now has a liability to pay those nuclear power plants in the

Ed Whitfield

1:36:36 to 1:36:56( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: neighborhood of $7 billion. and that's only for a period of time. after that if there's not some mechanism in place to take care of this stored- this spent fuel, there's going to be other lawsuits and there's going to be more money that's going to have to be paid by the american taxpayer. now, you know there are a lot of

Ed Whitfield

1:36:57 to 1:37:17( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: other countries that produce nuclear energy. in fact in france which is oftentimes viewed as the green country most of their electricity is produced by nuclear energy. and france has it, russia has it, japan has it, great britain

Ed Whitfield

1:37:18 to 1:37:38( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: has it, a lot of countries have it. but in america one of the techniques and one of the things that you can do to minimize the amount of the spent fuel is to reprocess it, and it is a technology that is fully developed and is being used today in france and japan and other countries around the world.

Ed Whitfield

1:37:39 to 1:38:00( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: now, the advantage of reprocessing is that you reduce even more the amount of waste that you have at the end. but in america we don't reprocess. and why? because when jimmy carter was president he made a decision --

Ed Whitfield

1:38:01 to 1:38:22( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and i'm not criticizing his decision because i don't truthfully know all the facts that went into his decision. and i'm sure he had good reason for his decision, but he signed an executive order that prohibited reprocessing of spent fuel in america. but every other country in the

Ed Whitfield

1:38:23 to 1:38:43( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: world is doing it with the exception of canada and that's because they use heavy water reactors in canada, and in america we use light water but the reason that i'm disappointed that this -- in the energy bill there's nothing about nuclear is because this is

Ed Whitfield

1:38:44 to 1:39:04( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: an issue that the american people and the american congress must revisit and that is reprocessing spent fuel. because we can drastically reduce the amount of waste. we also need to expedite the

Ed Whitfield

1:39:05 to 1:39:26( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: permitting process to produce more nuclear powerlants, because it can be done safely, it can be done cleanly and it is a strategy that we should pursue. because, as i indicated earlier, we're most dependent upon coal. next, nuclear. next we get down to renewables.

Ed Whitfield

1:39:27 to 1:39:47( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: and ethanol and biomass and all sorts of things. but i wanted to take this time this evening to just go over this whole process of the dilemma we face in nuclear, the potential dimma we face if a cap and trade system is adopted, because it will make

Ed Whitfield

1:39:48 to 1:40:11( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: us less competitive with countries like china and india, who are building more and more coal-powered plants. the less competitive it will make us if we implement this renewable mandate that 20% of electricity has to be produced by renewables. when the experience in spain has been for every job created

Ed Whitfield

1:40:12 to 1:40:33( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: in the renewable energy jobs, they lost 2.2 jobs. we have many challenges facing our country, no grter challenge than in energy. all of us respect the wisdom of the american people, if they knowhe facts, so i think it's our obligation as members of congress and members of the senate and president obama to go out and talk about these

Ed Whitfield

1:40:34 to 1:40:54( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: issues. get the facts out there. and let the american people decide. and i think once they know all these facts, they will recognize that we will have to continue using coal. we have a 250-year supply, our most abundant resource. we have the pilot projects

Ed Whitfield

1:40:55 to 1:41:17( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: already working that can help capture carbon dioxide and even use it. ev use the cap purr -- capture of carbon dioxide to put into oil wells to produce more oil. if we're going to be less dependent on foreign oil, we have to produce more oil in america. and that gets me back to tax

Ed Whitfield

1:41:18 to 1:41:36( Edit History Discussion )

Ed Whitfield: policy because one of the difficult issues in president obama's tax policy is, i understand he wants to do away with the oil deplotion allowance and change inventory rules. he wants to change some other tax breaks for small, independent oil producers which

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