Metavid

Video archive of the US Congress

Senate Proceeding on Jun 8th, 2011 :: 7:55:05 to 8:05:55
Total video length: 8 hours 50 minutes Stream Tools: Stream Overview | Edit Time

Note: MetaVid video transcripts may contain inaccuracies, help us build a more perfect archive

Download OptionsEmbed Video

Views:131 Duration: 0:10:50 Discussion

Previous speech: Next speech:

Claire McCaskill

7:55:01 to 7:55:24( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from missouri. a senator: america is full of amazing americans and at the thai top of this lace is frankry muse freeman. she has been selected to receive the extraordinary honor called

Claire McCaskill

7:55:05 to 8:05:55( Edit History Discussion )
Speech By: Claire McCaskill

Claire McCaskill

7:55:25 to 7:55:45( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: the spring arm medal, the naacp's highest national honor. ms. mccaskill: each year the naacp selects only one person in this country to receive the prestigious spingarn medal in recognition of particularly outstanding achievement. we in missouri are so proud of ms. freeman for her many

Claire McCaskill

7:55:46 to 7:56:08( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: accomplishments, including receiving this most distinguished award. while i am honored to come to the floor and congratulate frankie freeman, i regret that i will not be able to be in st. louis at the st. louis city and county freedom and fund dinner and celebrate in great woman and her many admirers and supporters from the st. louis area.

Claire McCaskill

7:56:09 to 7:56:32( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: frankie freeman is an amazing story. she is 94 years old and still has the passion to serve her community. at age 16, ms. freeman enrolled in her mother's alma mater, hampton institute. in 1947, before the presiding officer or i were ever born, she

Claire McCaskill

7:56:33 to 7:56:53( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: earned a law degree from howard university law school. during that time period, as one might imagine, there really weren't law firms that hired either women or african-americans, much less an african-american woman. so what did frankie freeman do? she decided to open her own law firm.

Claire McCaskill

7:56:54 to 7:57:15( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: she began her practice with divorce and criminal cases, and with a huge dose of pro bono cases. after two years, she became legal counsel to the naacp legal team that filed suit against the st. louis board of education in 1949. in 1954, freeman was the lead

Claire McCaskill

7:57:16 to 7:57:38( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: attorney for the landmark case davis v. st. louis housing authority, which ended legal racial discrimination in public housing in st. louis. in the almost 60 years since that decision, ms. freeman hasslesly fought for civil rights at home in st. louis and across the nation.

Claire McCaskill

7:57:39 to 7:57:59( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: she has endured abuse and discrimination but through it all she worked with intellect and dignity while employing one of her very best weapons: a warm and friendly personality and a very quick smile. in 1964, president lyndon johnson appointed her to serve as the first woman on the united

Claire McCaskill

7:58:00 to 7:58:21( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: states commission on civil rights. she continued to serve on the commission under presidents nixon, ford, and carter, recognizing that there was still much work -- much more work to do to end discrimination, ms. freeman joined with others to help form a bipartisan citizens commission on civil rights.

Claire McCaskill

7:58:22 to 7:58:43( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: frankie freeman's work hearnsed her many awards. she holds honorairery degrees from many universities, including hampton, the university of missouri, washington university, and howard university. and she has been inducted into the national bar association's hall of faivment despite this long history of accomplishments,

Claire McCaskill

7:58:44 to 7:59:04( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: frankie freeman still knows what's important: serving the community she loves. and at 94, she remains active in her local community by volunteering at her church and throughout her career she has served on local boards, including the national urban league of metropolitan st. louis and the united way of greater st. louis. along the way she's also had an

Claire McCaskill

7:59:05 to 7:59:26( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: opportunity to write a book about her life which i highly recommend to anyone for an inspiring story, a uniquely american story of a woman who had a vision at a time when women that looked like her weren't supposed to have a vision. ms. freeman will become the

Claire McCaskill

7:59:27 to 7:59:48( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: 96th recipient of the spingarn medal this july when she is honored during the naacp national convention in los angeles. passed spingarn medalists include maya angelou, and dr. martin luther king jr.

Claire McCaskill

7:59:49 to 8:00:10( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: this impressive list of exceptional americans gives you a sense of the caliber of the person attorney freeman really is. there is no doubt that attorney frankie freeman is deserving of this distinction. i am so proud of her for being honored with this recognition of her life long dedication to justice and civil rights. she is such an inspiration to me

Claire McCaskill

8:00:11 to 8:00:31( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: and she has been an inspiration to thousands of young people during her life and to so many americans, regardless of race, an inspiration for what she stands for and what she has accomplished in her lifetime. i am so grateful to call her my friend, and i thank her for all that she has done for the people of st. louis, the people of

Claire McCaskill

8:00:32 to 8:00:53( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: missouri, and the people of this great nation. congratulations and thank you, frankie freeman. mr. president, if i could also briefly spend a few moments to just talk about the economic development administration. there's lots of times that we debate legislation on this

Claire McCaskill

8:00:54 to 8:01:14( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: floor, and we do it in almost an academic way. and we think of the proposals in the abstract. unfortunately, there are many times that we don't think about the real consequences of legislation. this year, at this time this legislation feels very consequential to me.

Claire McCaskill

8:01:15 to 8:01:35( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: it feels very consequential because of what my state has gone through. the economic development administration plays a substantial role in making federal resources available to assist communities affected by disasters to rebuild and recover. as my colleagues in this chamber are well aware, the first half

Claire McCaskill

8:01:36 to 8:01:56( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: of this year has been devastating to my state. since the start of the year, 28 states have suffered at least one federally declared major disaster. missouri has been particularly hard hit, starting with severe storms on new year's eve, we've also had severe flooding on the mississippi river, multiple tornadoes, including one that

Claire McCaskill

8:01:57 to 8:02:18( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: struck and caused severe damage in st. louis, and obviously the historic tornado that has in fact done such damage to the community of joplin. we are also expecting additional extensive flooding along the missouri river in northwest missouri, and many families there are stealing for the worst

Claire McCaskill

8:02:19 to 8:02:40( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: as we wait for the waters to arrive. when disaster strikes, the federal government steps in, as it should, to support the efforts of state and local governments, not for profits, and the faith community to help communities recover and rebuild. in missouri, e.d.a. works with all 19 regional planning commissions in my state in a collaborative role to help carry out projects deemed important by

Claire McCaskill

8:02:41 to 8:03:02( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: local officials, particularly in the event of a natural disaster. the economic development administration's explicit mission includes the assistance of regions experiencing sudden and severe economic dislocations, such as those resulting from natural disasters. i just visited with people from a radio station in joplin.

Claire McCaskill

8:03:03 to 8:03:24( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: this radio station broadcasts -- the man i visited with, he was on the air for 33 straight hours. this radio station turned out to be one of the few methods of communication that everyone could rely on in the immediate hours after the tragedy struck. and 8 of the 28 employees that work at that radio station had all lost their homes, including

Claire McCaskill

8:03:25 to 8:03:45( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: the man that was on the air for 23 straight hours. there has been severe dislocation that has occurred in joplin, missouri. 2,000 homes wiped away clean, gone. another 6,000 structures, including homes and businesses,

Claire McCaskill

8:03:46 to 8:04:07( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: severely damaged and uninhabitable. there are thousands and thousands and thousands of people in joplin, missouri, that woke up that monday morning -- in fact, hadn't been to sleep the night before because they were busy huddling in rubble or

Claire McCaskill

8:04:08 to 8:04:29( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: camped out at a relative's home that had no place to go. in the past few years alone, e.d.a. has provided similar assistance in kansas, oklahoma, arkansas, nebraska, north dakota after disasters hit communities in those states. e.d.a. has already stepped up in joplin and established a $3 million revolving fund to assist small businesses in the area so

Claire McCaskill

8:04:30 to 8:04:50( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: that people are not -- have a place they can go back to in terms of their work after this kind of disaster. we have a long history in this country of rolling up our sleeves and working together in difficult times and the federal government has always been there providing financial support.

Claire McCaskill

8:04:51 to 8:05:11( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: the economic development administration is part of this support. it is my hope they will continue to provide this invaluable service. that is why this legislation is more important than words on a page. it can make a difference between someone being able to stay in the community, someone being able to go back to work, someone being able to put the pieces back together after a tragic loss. i hope that my colleagues take

Claire McCaskill

8:05:12 to 8:05:28( Edit History Discussion )

Claire McCaskill: this seriously and move quickly and promptly to support this legislation. and i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll.

Personal tools

MetaVid is a non-profit project of UC Santa Cruz and the Sunlight Foundation. Learn more About MetaVid

The C-SPAN logo and other servicemarks that may be found in video content are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Metavid