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Senate Proceeding 11-17-10 on Nov 17th, 2010 :: 1:45:25 to 1:55:30
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Benjamin L. Cardin

1:45:07 to 1:45:27( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cardin: mr. president, i ask that i be permitted to speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cardin: mr. president, i rise to talk about a very

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:45:25 to 1:55:30( Edit History Discussion )
Speech By: Benjamin L. Cardin

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:45:28 to 1:45:49( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: important health issue, sickle cell disease, that highlights the tremendous progress the scientific community has made over the years. this is a timely opportunity to bring up sickle cell disease because this month marks the 100th anniversary of its discovery. on november 16 and november 17, the national institutes of health will host a research symposium on sickle cell disease

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:45:50 to 1:46:10( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: to commemorate the accomplishments of the scientists and clinicians over the past century. the symposium named after the scientist who discovered the gene, dr. james b. henrick will bring to maryland more than 30 experts from around the world to discuss sickle cell disease research and treatment. sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder in

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:46:11 to 1:46:32( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: which red blood cells contain an abnormal type of hemoglobin and frequently sick on a sickle or crescent shape. these defective blood cells can block small blood vessels which can in turn lead to tissue damage or stroke. a common complication of this condition is severe pain in the limbs, chest, abdomen and back.

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:46:33 to 1:46:54( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: other complications are anemia, jaundice, severe infection and spleen, kidney and liver damage. life expectancy for sickle cell patients is shortened with studies reporting an average life expectancy of 42 years for male and 48 for female. sickle cell disease occurs commonly in people of african descent, although individuals of

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:46:55 to 1:47:16( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: middle eastern, mediterranean, central and south american and asian american heritage can inherit the disease as well. about one in 12 african-americans carry the gene for sickle cell disease and one in 400 americans have had the full-blown disease. it is estimated that over 80,000 americans have sickle cell disease, with about 2,000 babies born with the disease each year.

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:47:17 to 1:47:39( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: sickle cell disease can result in tremendous personal difficulties. natasha thomas is a 36-year-old african-american woman from baltimore, maryland. she considers herself fortunate to have access to quality care. despite some setbacks, she was able to complete middle school, high school and college, and she has been working consistently for 15 years. she has had employers who allow

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:47:40 to 1:48:01( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: her to take leave when she has sickle cell pain crisis. natasha admits that most of the people she knows with sickle cell disease are not as fortunate as she is. even though she has access to specialized care, natasha is hospitalized at least once a year with paralyzing pain. in the hospital, she has to undergo i.v. therapy with fluids

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:48:02 to 1:48:22( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: and narcotic pain medicine. natasha is grateful for the maryland medical assistance program which provided her with the necessary resources to get through difficult financial times when her conditions flare up. she admits if she didn't have coverage with specialized care, she would have had much more

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:48:23 to 1:48:44( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: pain and needed to receive blood transfusions. sickle cell disease is not a new phenomenon. people have been living with the disease for thousands of years. but in the last century, there have been remarkable advancements in diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell disease. i'm proud to say that scientists from maryland have played an important role in advancing sickle cell disease research. dr. morton goldberg, former head

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:48:45 to 1:49:07( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: of the wilmer eye institute in baltimore, is considered the world's foremost expert in diagnosis and treatment of eye disease due to sickle cell disease. dr. jim casilla and robert broski, both from johns hopkins, have made great strides in preventing stroke in young children and searching for cures through stem cell transplants respectfully.

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:49:08 to 1:49:30( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: improvements in sickle cell treatment have led to increased life expack tansy from 14 in 1975 -- expectancy. there were 240 ongoing or recently completed n.i.h.-funded trials giving better diagnosis or treatment of the disease.

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:49:31 to 1:49:52( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: under the leadership of its director, the n.i.h. is poised to continue pushing the envelope for scientific innovations for find ago cure for sickle cell disease. despite all of these technology advances, sickle cell disease remains a significant problem. the annual cost of medicare for nearly 80,000 individuals with sickle cell disease in the united states exceeds $1.1 billion.

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:49:53 to 1:50:13( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: the average cost of care per month per patient is nearly $2,000. studies show for an average patient with sickle cell disease reaching age 45, the total costs are estimated to reach $950,000. what's worrisome is that the additional costs associated with reduced quality of life, uncompensated care, lost

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:50:14 to 1:50:34( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: productivity and premature mortality pushes the cost well beyond $1 million per patient. the enormous cost of this underscores the importance of finding a safe cure for sickle cell disease. we're finding the research in this unconscious and conscious racial bias adversely affect the

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:50:35 to 1:50:55( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: availability of resources for research, delivery of care and improvement of that care. i particularly am concerned because there is a significant gap in funding for more publicized but less prevalent diseases as compared to sickle cell disease. the gap in funding was first addressed in 1970 by dr. robert scott when he published the

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:50:56 to 1:51:16( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: landmark articles in the "new england journal of medicine" and the "journal of the american medical association." dr. scott's articles spurred congressional hearings that led to the passage of the first major legislation concerning sickle cell disease treatment, the national sickle cell anemia control act in 1972. since passage of that act, a number of research grants for sickle cell disease has risen by

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:51:17 to 1:51:38( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: a factor of ten. despite increased research dollars for sickle cell disease, the major advances of treatment, important gaps still exist in the equity of federal fungal occasions and the provision of highly qualified clinical care. the disparity in funding sickle cell disease in the private sector is even more pronounced than it is in the federal

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:51:39 to 1:51:59( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: government. besides our moral obligation to ensure that patients receive appropriate care, there is also an economic argument. research showing the high proportion of sickle cell disease costs associated with in-patient hospitalization suggest that interventions that reduce complications such as pain crisis could be cost saving. we have made significant

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:52:00 to 1:52:20( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: progress towards broadening coverage for all americans, but in the united states department of health of human services must ensure that the implementation of health policy as it pertains to sickle cell disease is done with emphasis on high-quality, equitable care. we need to make sure that the standard of care is available to

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:52:21 to 1:52:41( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: all and that guide lines through the primary care centers caring for patients with sickle cell disease. with the recent codification of the office of minority health at the department of health and human services, we can assure that our investment is producing new knowledge in a balanced -- in a balanced but a similarly robust commitment to universal diffusion of this knowledge.

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:52:42 to 1:53:03( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: this way, all patients will reap the full benefit of our investment in research. in addition to sickle cell disease, the office of minority health will help us address many other issues pertaining to health disparity. health disparities and health care delivery system are a huge issue. health disparities are differences in health along

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:53:04 to 1:53:26( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: social, economic, racial or ethnic lines. many disparities exist in our country. let's look at the disparity through the lens of life expectancy. the life expectancy for african-americans is 5.3 years lower than whites. education also affects life expectancy. individuals with college education can expect to live on average six years longer than people who have never graduated high school.

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:53:27 to 1:53:47( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: and life expectancy of people over 400% of the federal poverty level is on average seven years longer than those at or below the federal poverty level. these differences are stark, and we need to have a strategy to deal with them. we need to know how we can reach out to the minority communities to deal with their special needs. in addition to codifying the office of minority health, the

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:53:48 to 1:54:08( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: recently enacted health care reform bill supports a network of minority health offices located within h.h.s., and it elevated the national center of minority health and health disparities in new hampshire from a center to an institute. the office of minority health will be essential for addressing health disparities in america by monitoring health status, health

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:54:09 to 1:54:29( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: care trends and quality of care among minority patients and elevating the success of minority health programs and initiatives. over the next year, i plan to return to the senate floor to highlight how we as a nation and the office of minority health in particular can tackle health disparities. through a series of presentations, i hope to raise the awareness about the health

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:54:30 to 1:54:51( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: disparity issues in our country, and i hope to direct our attention to the proper implementation of the affordable care act so that the full potential of this legislation can be realized. i am proud of the progress that we have made with the health care reform legislation. i'm proud of the creation of the office of minority health. on this 100th anniversary of the discovery of sickle cell

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:54:52 to 1:55:12( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: disease, i commend the scientific and medical communities for their contributions to diagnostic and treatment of this important condition. with that, mr. president, i would ask unanimous consent that my entire statement will appear in the record along with three charts that are attached. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cardin: and i would suggest the -- i would yield -- i would

Benjamin L. Cardin

1:55:13 to 1:55:22( Edit History Discussion )

Benjamin L. Cardin: suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk

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